The Smithsonian – Sunday NOT Pagan

 

"While most of its 19 museums, its zoo, and its nine research centers facilities are located in Washington, D.C., sites are also located in Arizona, Maryland, New York City, Virginia, Panama, and elsewhere. The Smithsonian has over 136 million items in its collections." - Wikipedia

Dear Sir:

I have referred your letter of September 14th to Dr. I. M. Casonawicz, Assistant Curator of Old World Archeology, who furnishes the following replies to your several inquiries:

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1. Did the pagan Romans and Greeks ever have any regular weekly day of rest from secular work?

Ans. No.

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2. Did they ever have any weekly festival day?

Ans. No.

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3. Did they have any regular weekly day when they assembled for pagan worship?

Ans. No.

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4. When was our calendar of the week first introduced among the Romans and Greeks?

Ans. The division of the month into weeks was introduced into Rome from Egypt. The date is uncertain, but it was not earlier than the second century, A.D.

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5. When was our calendar of the week first recognized in Roman law?

Ans. The earliest Sunday legislation was enacted under Constantine I, 321 A.D. No legislation of earlier date on the division of the month is known.

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6. As each day of the week was dedicated to some god, as Sunday to the Sun, Monday to the Moon, Saturday to Saturn, etc., was each of these supposed deities worshiped on one particular day more than any other day?

Ans. No.

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7. Did the pagan Romans have anyone special day in the week when individuals, if they chose, went to make prayers or offerings to their gods?

Ans. No.

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8. Did Apollo have any special day in the week or month more than any other day when he was worshiped with prayers or offerings?

Ans. No.

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Very truly yours, R. RATHBORN,

Assistant Sec. in charge of National Museum.

Here we have two of the most reliable witnesses in the world perfectly agreeing. If their testimony is worth anything, then Adventists must revise their theory that Sunday sacredness, or Sunday festivals, or Sunday rest days originated with pagans.

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Source: The Lord’s Day From Neither Catholics nor Pagans – D.M. Canright

 

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